Deep Engine 2

More data from the Deep Engine. All results are based on ten million trials.

Here’s the results for all 30 parks from the TPB 2007 data:

     power:     5        4        3        2        1

   homerun:   48.55%   32.38%   19.18%    9.26%    3.11%
    caught:   47.55%   63.72%   76.92%   86.84%   92.99%
      foul:    3.90%    3.90%    3.90%    3.89%    3.90%

As expected, no significant changes from 2006.

I re-ran with the 12 2008 ABL parks, using the TPB 2007 data.

     power:     5        4        3        2        1

   homerun:   40.45%   24.74%   12.86%    5.28%    1.54%
    caught:   55.65%   71.36%   83.24%   90.82%   94.56%
      foul:    3.90%    3.90%    3.90%    3.89%    3.90%

Wow, there are some big parks in the 2008 ABL! It’s much harder to homer, especially for the light hitters who will find it almost twice as hard to hit them out in the ABL compared to the 30-park circuit.

Now let’s see how the numbers look for the different hitting types. Again, this is ten million trials in the 2008 ABL parks.

Rsp
     power:     5        4        3        2        1
   homerun:   39.79%   24.05%   12.36%    5.01%    1.44%
    caught:   57.61%   73.34%   85.03%   92.38%   95.95%
      foul:    2.60%    2.61%    2.61%    2.60%    2.60%


Lsp
     power:     5        4        3        2        1
   homerun:   39.96%   24.20%   12.48%    5.02%    1.46%
    caught:   57.44%   73.19%   84.91%   92.38%   95.94%
      foul:    2.60%    2.60%    2.61%    2.59%    2.60%


Rp
     power:     5        4        3        2        1
   homerun:   40.83%   25.34%   13.35%    5.72%    1.68%
    caught:   53.98%   69.47%   81.46%   89.09%   93.11%
      foul:    5.19%    5.19%    5.19%    5.19%    5.21%


Lp
     power:     5        4        3        2        1
   homerun:   41.23%   25.34%   13.21%    5.37%    1.58%
    caught:   53.55%   69.47%   81.58%   89.43%   93.23%
      foul:    5.21%    5.19%    5.21%    5.20%    5.19%

Not surprisingly, the pull hitters end up with more foul balls. In spite of that, they still end up with a greater probability of homering.

This data can be combined with the batter’s power & the average deeps to estimate the number of home runs a batter will get with Deep! rolls against an average pitcher. Actually, the difference in home-run potential is so similar among the hitting types, that it’s not worth making a distinction. So, for example, a power-5 hitter will homer on about 40% of his 18.7 deep rolls against the average pitcher, effectively giving him an additional 7.5 home-run range.

Combine this with the power distribution, and the probability of a home run on a Deep roll works out to 20.4%. That’s an important number for rating individual pitchers against the average batter.

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